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Annuals of Ulster

The Annuals of Ulster

The Four Masters is the collective name given to the compilers of the Annals of the History of Ireland, one of the largest collections of history, if not the largest, ever collected in this or any other country, and collected, I might say, in the face of great adversity, the entire country being by then dominated by the enemies of the Gaels, who had been defeated at Kinsale, and without which work much of the history of Gaelic Ireland would be unknown today. The scope of the work ranges from the first invasion of Ireland by the Gaels until the year 1616, being a period of over 3,000 years. The leader of the group of scholars who were set the task of compiling these annals, which later became known as the Four Masters was one Br. Michael O Cleary.

Who were the Annualists

The task of bringing all the Annals together commenced at the Monastery of Donegal on the 22nd January 1632 and was finished four years later on the 10th August 1636, and was signed by , Fr Bernardine O'Cleary, Guardian of Donegal Monastery, Br. Maurice Dunleavey and Br. Bonaventure O Donnell as witnesses. In order to get testimony as to the integrity of these Annals, it was sent for inspection to the most distinguished Irish scholars of the day, to obtain their signatures and approbation. These men were Flann Mac Egan of BallymacEgan, Tipperary, Conor Mac Brody, Ollamh of Thomond, Malachy O Kelly, Archbishop of Tuam, Boetius Mac Egan, Bishop of Elfinn, Thomas Fleming, Archbishop of Dublin and Primate of Ireland, and Fr. Roche, Bishop of Kildare.

M980.2 Anmchadh, Bishop of Cill-dara, completed his virtuous life in this world, at an advanced life. Eoghan Ua Cathain, Abbot of Cluain-fearta-Brenainn; Sinach, son of Murthuilen, Abbot of Beannchair; Clerchen, son of Donnghal, successor of Feichin; Conaing Ua Flannagain, vice-airchinneach of Ard-Macha; and Rothechtach of Daimhinis, a priest, died.

M1138.6

Raghnall, son of Imhar Ua Cathain, lord of the Craebh, Cianachta, and Fir-Li , fell through treachery and guile, by the Ui-Eoghain of the Valley.

M1145.1

Sluaigheadhach Ua Cathain , bishop and virgin, of the people of Leithghlinn, died.

M1156.14

Aedh, son of Ruaidhri Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, was slain by Ua Cathain and Feara-na-Craeibhe , by treachery.

M1157.10

king, and banished Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain from among them. He afterwards divided Munster between the son of Mac Carthaigh, i.e. Diarmaid, son of Cormac, and Conchobhar, son of Domhnall Ua Briain. He afterwards came to Magh-Ua-Farca, and sent forth a marauding host over Adhairceach, into Sil-Anmchadha. This host was defeated, and many of them were slain, together with Ua Cathain of Craeibh . On this occasion the Cinel-Eoghain destroyed Ros-Cre. He Muircheartach returned from thence to his house in triumph.

M1167.6

A hosting and mustering of the men of Ireland, with their chieftains, by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair . Thither came Diarmaid, son of Cormac, lord of Desmond; Muircheartach Ua Briain, lord of Thomond; Diarmaid Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Meath; Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Oirghialla; and all the chieftains of Leinster. They afterwards arrived in Tir-Eoghain, and Ua Conchobhair divided the territory into two parts, i.e. gave that part of Tir-Eoghain north of the mountain, i.e. Callainn, to Niall Ua Lochlainn, for two hostages, i.e. Ua Cathain of Craebh, and Macan-Ghaill Ua Brain, and that part of the country of the Cinel to the south of the mountain to Aedh Ua Neill, for two other hostages, i.e. Ua Maelaedha, one of the Cinel-Aenghusa, and Ua hUrthuile, one of the Ui-Tuirtre Ua Neill's own foster-brothers. The men of Ireland returned back southwards over Sliabh-Fuaid, through Tir-Eoghain, and Tir-Conaill, and over Eas-Ruaidh to meet thelr sea-fleet; and Ua Conchobhair escorted the lord of Desmond, with his forces, southwards through Thomond as far as Cnoc-Aine with many jewels and riches.

M1171.11

A great predatory force was led by Maghnus Mac Duinnsleibhe Ua hEochadha and the Ulidians into Cuil-an-tuais-ceirt; and they plundered Cuil-rathain Coleraine and other churches. A small party of the Cinel-Eoghain, under Conchobhair Ua Cathain , overtook them; and a battle was fought between them, in which the Ulidians were defeated, with the loss of one-and-twenty chieftains and sons of chieftains, with many others of the commonalty; and Maghnus himself was wounded, but he escaped from the conflict on that occasion. He was afterwards killed by his own brother, Donnsleibhe, and Gilla-Aenghusa, son of Mac Gillaepscoip, ruler.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1172. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred seventy-two.

BRIGIDIAN O' KANE , successor of Maidoc, died.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1175. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred seventy-five.

The Kinel-Enda were defeated, and a great slaughter made of them by Eachmarcach O' Kane , and Niall O'Gormly. The Kinel-Enda were defeated, and a great slaughter made of them by Eachmarcach O'Kane , and Niall O'Gormly.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1178. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred seventy-eight.

up Rory O'Flaherty as their chieftain: but the three sons of this O'Flaherty acted a treacherous part towards the Kinel-Moen;they slew Donnell, the son of Donnell O'Gormly, Tiernan, the son of Randal Mac Donnell, and eight other gentlemen of the Kinel-Moen. Randal, the son of Eachmarcach O'Kane , had been slain by the Kinel-Moen in the beginning of this summer, and in revenge of this were slain Galagh O'Loony and Murtough O'Petan; and it was in revenge of this, moreover, the aforesaid act of treachery was committed against the Kinel-Moen.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1181. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred eighty-one.

The men of Moy-Ithe, together with O'Kane Eachmarcach, and the Kinel-Binny of the Valley, mustered an army, and crossed Toome. They plundered all the territories of Firlee and Hy-Tuirtre, and carried off many thousands of cows.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1182. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred eighty two.

Hugh O'Kaelly, Bishop of Oriel, and head of the Canons of Ireland, died. Donnell O'Huallaghan, Archbishop of Munster, died. Donnell, the son of Hugh O'Loughlin, marched with an army to Dunbo, in Dal Riada, and there gave battle to the English. The Kinel-Owen were defeated, and Randal O'Breslen, Gilchreest O'Kane , and many others, were killed. On this occasion they carried off with them the Gospel of St. Martin.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1192. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred ninety-two.

The doorway of the refectory of Duv-regles-Columbkille was made by O'Kane , of Creeve, and the daughter of O'Henery.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1195. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred ninety-five.

Donnell O'Conaing Gunning, Bishop of Killaloe, died.

Florence, the son of Regan O'Mulrony, Bishop of Elphin, died.

Donnell O'Finn, Coarb of Clonfert-Brendan, died.

Eachmarcach O'Kane died in St. Paul's church.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1196.

The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred ninety-six.

The Abbey ofSS. Peter and Paul at Armagh, with its churches, and a great part of the Rath, were burned. Murtough, the son of Murtough O'Loughlin, Lord of Kinel-Owen, presumptive heir to the throne of Ireland, tower of the valour and achievements of Leth-Chuinn, destroyer of the cities and castles of the English, and founder of churches and fair nemeds (sanctuaries), was killed by Donough, the son of Blosky O'Kane , at the instigation of the Kinel-Owen, who had pledged their loyalty to him before the Three Shrines and the Canoin-Phatruig i.e. the Book of Armagh. His body was carried to Derry, and there interred with honour and respect.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1197. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred ninety-seven.

Conor O'Kane died. Conor, the son of Teige, Lord of Moylurg and Moynai, tower of the grandeur,splendour, hospitality, and protection of all Connaught, died after exemplary penance in the monastery of Ath-da-laarg (Boyle).

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1205. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred five.

Manus O'Kane , son of the Lord of Kianaghta and Firnacreeva, tower of the valour and vigour of the North, was wounded by an arrow, and died of the wound.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1212. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred twelve.

Drumquin, with its churches, was burned by the Kinel-Owen, without the consent of O'Neill. Farrell O'Kane , Lord of Kienaghta and Firnacreeva, was slain by the English.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1213. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred thirteen.

O'Kane and the sept of Firnacreeva, came to Derry to take the house of the son of Mac Loughlin. The great prior, of the abbey church of Derry, who interposed to make peace between them, was killed. God and St. Columbkille wrought a miracle on this occasion; for Mahon Magaithne, the person who had gathered and mustered the army, was killed in the doorway of the church of Duvregles, in revenge of Columbkille. The castle of Coleraine was erected by Thomas Mac Uchtry, and the English of Ulidia; and all the cemeteries and buildings of the town were thrown down excepting only the church to supply materials for erecting this castle.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1222. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred twenty-two.

Niall O'Neill violated Derry with the daughter of O'Kane , but God and St. Columbkille were avenged for that deed, for he did not live long after it.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1247. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred forty-seven.

Eachmarcach O'Kane , Lord of Kienaghta and Firnacreeva, was slain by Manus O'Kane , after having gone on a predatory excursion into his country as far as Armoy in Dal-Riada.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1252. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred fifty-two.

Conor Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry in Tyrone, and many other territories, and peace-maker of Tirconnell, Tyrone, and Oriel, was slain by the people of Brian O'Neill, while defending his protegees against them, he himself being under the protection of O'Gormly and O'Kane .

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1260. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred sixty.

The battle of Druim-dearg, near Dun-da-leath-ghlas Downpatrick was fought by Brien O'Neill and Hugh O'Conor, against the English of the North of Ireland. In this battle many of the Irish chieftains were slain, viz. Brian O'Neill, the Chief of Ireland; Donnell O'Cairre; Dermot Mac Loughlin; Manus O'Kane ; Kian O'Henery; Donslevy Mac Cann; Conor O'Duvdirma, and his son Hugh; Hugh O'Kane ; Murtough O'Kane ; Auliffe O'Gormly; Cu-Uladh O'Hanlon; and Niall O'Hanlon. In a word, fifteen of the chiefs of the family of O'Kane were slain on the field. Some of the chiefs of Connaught also fell there, namely, Gilchreest, son of Conor, son of Cormac, son of Tomaltagh Mae Dermot, Lord of Moylurg; Cathal, son of Tiernan O'Conor; Mulrony Mac Donough; Cathal, son of Donough, the son of Murtough; Hugh son of Murtough Finn; Teige, son of Cathal, son of Brian O'Mulrony; Dermot, son of Teige, son of Murray, son of Tomaltagh O'Mulrony; Conor Mac Gilla-Arraith; Teige, son of Kian O'Gara; Gillabarry O'Quin; Carolus, son of the Bishop O'Murray; and many others, both of the Irish nobility and the plebeians.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1287. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred eighty-seven.

Adam Cusack, Benmumhan, daughter of O'Kane , and Donnell O'Hanly, Chief of Kenel-Dofa in the county of Roscommon, died.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1303. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred three.

Melaghlin Mac Brian, Bishop of Elphin, died; and Donough O'Flanagan took the bishopric after him. Turlough, the son of Donnell Oge O'Donnell, usually called Turlough of Cnoc-an-Madhma, Lord of Tirconnell, a warlike tower of protection in battle, and the Cuchullin of the Clann-Daly in valour, was slain by his brother, Hugh, son of Donnell Oge, after a long war, during which much of their country was spoiled between them in every direction; and great numbers of the Kinel-Owen, of the chiefs of the English of the North, and of the Kinel-Connell themselves, were slaughtered along with him. Among these were Murtough Mac Clancy, Chief of Dartry; Donn O'Kane , Lord of Firnacreeva and Kienaghta; Donough Mac Menman, and Hugh Mac Menman; two grandsons of the Ferleighin Lector O'Donnell; Niall, son of Niall O'Boyle, heir presumptive to the Three Tuathas; Mac Hugossa, his son, and brother; Adam Sandal; and many others, as well English as Irish. After this, Hugh, son of Donnell Oge, enjoyed the lordship of Tirconnell in happiness and prosperity as long as he lived.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1349. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred forty-nine.

Rory O'Kane , Lord of Creeve and Ard-Keanaghta, died.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1376. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred seventy-six.

Conor O'Beaghan, a learned Historian; Kellach Mac Curtin, chief Historian of Thomond; John O'Rooney, chief Poet to Magennis; Melaghlin O'Mulvany, Ollav to O'Kane ; Donough Mac Firbis, a good Historian; and Ruarcan O'Hamill, chief Poet to O'Hanlon, died. This Ruarcan had kept a house of general hospitality, and had never refused to receive any one. Cooey O'Kane , Lord of Orieacht-Ui-Chathain, was taken prisoner by the English in the port of Coleraine, and sent by them to Carrickfergus in fetters.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1381. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred eighty-one.

Duvcovla, the daughter of Hugh Mac Dermot, and wife of Cathal Roe Mac Rannall; Lasarina, the daughter of Turlough O'Conor, and wife of Mac Rannall; Finola, the daughter of Cooey O'Kane , and wife of Turlough Mac Sweeny; Sabia, the daughter of Ulick Burke, and wife of O'Conor; Duvcovla, the daughter of O'Conor Faly, and wife of Donnell, the son of Theobald O'Molloy; and Lasarina, the daughter of Farrell O'Duigennan, and wife of O'Meehin of Ballagh, died.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1383. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred eighty-three.

Cathan, son of Rory O'Kane ; John Gallda, the son of the Earl; William Barrott; and Rory, the son of Hugh Oge O'Molloy, Lord of Fircall, died.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1385. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred eighty-five.

Cathal O'Farrell, worthy heir to the lordship of Annaly; and Cooey O'Kane , Lord of Oireacht-Ui-Chathain, died, while at the pinnacle of prosperity and renown.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1396. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred ninety-six.

Mary, the daughter of O'Kane , and wife of O'Doherty, died.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1402. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred two.

A great war broke out between O'Donnell (Turlough, the son of Niall) and O'Kane (Manus); and during this war O'Kane 's tribe was plundered, and the territory totally spoiled by O'Donnell.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1403. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred three.

Manus, son of Cooey O'Kane , Lord of Kienaghta, died.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1412. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred twelve.

A great war broke out between O'Donnell on the one side, and O'Kane and the sons of John O'Donnell on the other; and O'Kane and the sons of John came with their forces into Tirconnell, and slew fourteen of O'Donnell's people, as also the son of Felim O'Donnell, and Cathal, the son of Randal O'Boyle.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1422. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred twenty-two.

Niall Garv, the son of Turlough, son of Niall Garv O'Donnell, went into Fermanagh, subjugated Maguire, Mac Mahon, and Magennis, and brought them with him to O'Kane , who also submitted to him. From thence they proceeded, attended by the sons of O'Kane , to Mac-I-Neill Boy, and completely plundered the Glynns of Antrim and Mac Eoin Bisset, and burned the country; and they proceeded into Clannaboy and Moylinny, the spoils of which territories they carried off to Carrickfergus, and afterwards returned home in safety.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1422.

The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred twenty-two.

Niall Garv, the son of Turlough, son of Niall Garv O'Donnell, went into Fermanagh, subjugated Maguire, Mac Mahon, and Magennis, and brought them with him to O'Kane , who also submitted to him. From thence they proceeded, attended by the sons of O'Kane , to Mac-I-Neill Boy, and completely plundered the Glynns of Antrim and Mac Eoin Bisset, and burned the country; and they proceeded into Clannaboy and Moylinny, the spoils of which territories they carried off to Carrickfergus, and afterwards returned home in safety.

Niall Garv, the son of Turlough, son of Niall Garv O'Donnell, went into Fermanagh, subjugated Maguire, Mac Mahon, and Magennis, and brought them with him to O'Kane , who also submitted to him. From thence they proceeded, attended by the sons of O'Kane , to Mac-I-Neill Boy, and completely plundered the Glynns of Antrim and Mac Eoin Bisset, and burned the country; and they proceeded into Clannaboy and Moylinny, the spoils of which territories they carried off to Carrickfergus, and afterwards returned home in safety.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1428. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred twenty-eiqht.

Dermot O'Kane , Lord of Kienaghta and Creeve, a man full of triumphs and great honours, died.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1432. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred thirty-two

O'Neill, i.e. Donnell Bog, the son of Henry Aimhreidh, was slain in O'Kane 's country by the two sons of Dermot O'Kane , i.e. Donnell and Aibhne, assisted by the O'Kane s in general, after they had taken by assault the house in which he was. Donnell O'Neill, Patrick O'Mulholland, and the son of O'Mellain, were also slain. Owen, the son of Niall Oge O'Neill, was inaugurated his (O'Neill's) successor on Leac na Riogh, at Tullaghoge.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1433. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred thirty-three.

O'Kane , i.e. Godfrey, the son of Cooey, died.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1442. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred forty-two.

A war arose between O'Kane and Mac Quillin, in which Mac Quillin and the sons of Brian Oge O'Neill routed O'Kane , and killed thirty-two of his people. The same war continued between O'Kane and Mac Quillin; and in the course of it many depredations and slaughters were committed: the son of Mac Quillin was slain by O'Kane , and depredations were committed by Mac Quillin on Aibhne O'Kane .

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1454. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred fifty-four.

Donnell, the son of Niall Garv O'Donnell, was installed in the lordship of Tirconnell, in opposition to the real O'Donnell (Rury, the son of Naghtan). And not long after this Donnell was treacherously taken prisoner in his own house by O'Doherty, who sent him to be imprisoned in the castle of Inis. As soon as Rury had received tidings of this, he mustered an army. O'Kane and Mac Quillin came without delay to his assistance, bringing all their forces with them; and they proceeded to demolish the castle in which Donnell was imprisoned, with a few persons about him to guard the place, among whom was Cathal O'Duvdirma. Rury and his army burned the gate and door of the castle, and set the stairs on fire; whereupon, Donnell, thinking that his life would be taken as soon as the army should reach the castle, entreated (it being his dying request) that he might be loosed from his fetters, as he deemed it treacherous to be killed while imprisoned and fettered. His request was granted, and he was loosed from his fetters; after which he ascended to the battlements of the castle, to view the motions of the invading army. And he saw Rury beneath, with eyes flashing opposition, and waiting until the fire should subside, that he might enter, and kill him. Donnell then, finding a large stone by his side, hurled it directly down upon Rury, so that it fell on the crest of his helmet, on the top of his head, and fractured it, so that he instantly died. The invading forces were afterwards defeated, and by this throw Donnell saved his own life,and acquired the lordship of Tirconnell.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1467. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred sixty-seven.

O'Neill (Henry) marched with an army into Oireacht Ui-Chathain O'Kane 's territory. It was on this expedition that Philip Maguire, the best man of his country in his time, was slain.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1468. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred sixty-eight.

O'Kane , i.e. Manus, died.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1472. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred seventy-two.

Mahon, the son of Turlough 0'Brian, Tanist of Thomond, died. O'Kane , Rory Ainsheasgar, was treacherously slain by Mac Quillin, i.e. Seinicin Carragh. Con, the son of Hugh Boy O'Neill, assembled his forces, and Godfrey O'Kane , the brother of this Rory, proceeded along with him into the Route to take vengeance on Mac Quillin for the death of Rory. A battle was fought between them, in which Godfrey O'Kane , a man full of charity, hospitality, and nobleness, was slain by Rury Mac Quillin with one cast of a javelin. On the next day the same Con made an incursion into the Route, and gave the Mac Quillins a great defeat, and killed Mac Quillin himself; i.e. Cormac. Rory was called the Mac Quillin, and a peace was made with Con, son of Hugh Boy. They then made an appointment for a conference with the O'Kane s, and Mac Quillin went into a small cot at the mouth of the River Bann, intending to present himself before O'Kane ; but as he was landing he was attacked by a party of O'Kane 's people, who slew him, and drowned him in the Bann.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1489. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred eighty-nine.

O'Neill, i.e. Con, the son of Henry, went into O'Kane 's territory, where he did great injuries, and took away with him their hostages.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1490. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred ninety.

O'Kane , John, the son of Aibhne, son of Dermot, was taken by the crew of a ship, who came from Inbher-Air.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1491. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred ninety-one.

O'Kane , i.e. John, the son of Aibhne, son of Dermot, was released from captivity; and his creaghts were taken by him from the sons of Manus O'Kane , before any person of his own country had heard of his liberation.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1492. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred ninety-two.

Aibhne, the son of Aibhne O'Kane , and Godfrey and John Gallda, two sons of John (i.e. the O'Kane ), son of Aibhne, son of Dermot, were slain by Walter Mac Quillin, John Cahanagh, son of John, son of Donnell Ballagh, and Thomas O'Kane , their own father's brother, at whose instigation they came to commit that slaughter.The son of Rury Mac Quillin, and a great number of foot soldiers along with him, were slain by O'Kane .

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1493. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred ninety-three.

O'Donnell went to Tyrone, at the instance of O'Donnell, the son of Henry, son of Owen; and Donnell was nominated O'Neill; and he brought away the hostages of the country, except those of O'Kane and O'Mellan. Henry Oge was nominated another O'Neill by O'Kane and O'Mellan, in opposition to Donnell, which was not lawful, as Donnell was the senior.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1498. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred ninety-eight.

O'Kane , i.e. John, the son of Aibhne, died; and Thomas, his brother, took his place.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1501. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred one.

Aibhne, the son of John O'Kane , was slain by his own brother, Brian Finn.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1503. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred three.

The son of O'Kane (Richard) was maimed by his own brother, Donnell Cleireach.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1505. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred five.

Donough O'Kane , Abbot of the monastery of Magh-Cosgrain, was hanged by Dermot, the son of Rory, son of Manus O'Kane ; and Dermot himself was maimed for that deed. O'Donnell, Hugh Roe, the son of Niall Garv, son of Turlough of the Wine, Lord of Tirconnell, Inishowen, Kinel-Moen, and Lower Connaught, died; a man who had obtained hostages from the people of Fermanagh, Oriel, Clannaboy, and the Route, and from the O'Kanes , and also the English and Irish of Connaught, with the exception of Mac William of Clanrickard, who, however, did not go unrevenged for his disobedience, for O'Donnell frequently entered his territory, and left not a quarter of land from the River Suck upwards, and from Sliabh O n-Aedha westwards, which he did not make tributary to him. This O'Donnell was the full moon of the hospitality and nobility of the North, the most jovial and valiant, the most prudent in war and peace, and of, the best jurisdiction, law, and rule, of all the Gaels in Ireland in his time; for there was no defence made of the houses in Tirconnell during his time, except to close the door against the wind only; the best protector of the Church and the learned; a man who had given great alms in honour of the Lord of the Elements; the man by whom a castle was first raised and erected at Donegal, that it might serve as a sustaining bulwark for his descendants; and a monastery for Friars de Observantia in

Tirconnell, namely, the monastery of Donegal; a man who had made many predatory excursions around through Ireland; and a man who may be justly styled the Augustus of the North-west of Europe. He died, after having gained the victory over the Devil and the world, and after Extreme Unction and good Penance, at his own fortress in Donegal, on Friday, the 5th of the Ides of July, in the seventy-eighth year of his age, and forty-fourth of his reign, and was interred in the monastery of Donegal.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1506. The Age af Christ, one thousand five hundred six.

The son of O'Kane , i.e. Brian Finn, the son of John, was slain by Donnell, the son of Niall, son of Henry, son of Owen O'Neill; and a son of this Brian was slain by Donough O'Kane . Mac Quillin, i.e. Walter, the son of Cormac, son of Jenkin, was slain by O'Kane , i.e. Thomas, the son of Aibhne. There were slain along with him two sons of Tuathal O'Donnell, two sons of O'Hara, three sons of O'Boylan, two sons of O'Quin, and seventeen of the chief men of his tribe, in the territory of the Route. O'Kane , i.e. Thomas, the son of Aibhne, and the sons of John, son of Aibhne, namely, Donough and Donnell Cleireach, went eastwards across the Bann, and carried off from thence many herds, and horses, and returned in exultation and triumph. The son of O'Kane (Godfrey, the son of Thomas) was slain by the descendants of Manus O'Kane . Aibhilin, the daughter of O'Kane (Thomas), and wife of Owen Roe, the son of O'Neill, died.

 

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1514. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred fourteen.

The castle of Coleraine was taken and demolished by O'Donnell, inrevenge of Donnell O'Kane 's violation of his guarantee. O'Kane , i.e. Thomas, the son of Aithne, died. He had before this time of his death been taken prisoner, and forcibly deprived of his lordship by Donough O'Kane .

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1522. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred twenty-two.

Donnell i.e. Donnell Cleireach, the son of John O'Kane , the paragon of the youth of his tribe, and a man of general hospitality, was slain by the people of the Route.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1523. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred twenty-three.

O'Kane (Donough, the son of John), the best patron of his own tribe, in his time, of the learned and the distressed, died. Four and twenty years, 'tis true, A thousand and five hundred, From birth of Christ till death of Hugh, Should any one inquire. A great war broke out among the O'Kane s, in which Cumaighe. the son of Brian Finn O'Kane , was slain, and Ferdoragh, the son of Rory, of the Route. In this war was also slain Hugh Carragh, the son of O'Doherty, by Godfrey, the son of Godfrey O'Kane , together with a party of his people,they having gone to assist John, the son of Thomas O'Kane . Cumhaighe Ballagh, the son of Donnell O'Kane , a distinguished gentleman, considering his means, was slain by some of the people of the Route.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1525. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred twenty-five.

O'Kane , i.e. John, the son of Thomas, was slain by a party of his own tribe, namely, Rory O'Kane of the Route, the son of Godfrey O'Kane ,and others.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1526. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred twenty-six.

O'Kane (Godfrey, son of Godfrey) was slain at Bealach-an-Chamain, by the son of O'Neill (Niall Oge); and Niall himself was soon afterwards taken prisoner by O'Neill, and he was detained a long time in captivity. The son of O'Kane , i.e. Godfrey, heir to the lordship of his own country, set out upon a predatory incursion into Gleann-Concadhan, in the month of January; and he perished in consequence of the intense cold of the winter; nor was there a word heard about him until the end of the following Lent, when his body was discovered. Henry, son of Niall, who was son of Niall, Lord of Baile-na-braghat, was slain on this occasion; and many others perished of cold and were slain along with them.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1530. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred thirty.

The Bishop of Elphin, i.e. the Greek Bishop, died. A chapter of the friars was held at Donegal; and it was O'Donnell (Hugh Oge) that supplied them with every thing they stood in need of; or desired, while they remained together on that occasion. Catherine, the daughter of Mac Sweeny, and wife of O'Doherty, and Rose, the daughter of O'Kane , and wife of Felim O'Doherty, died. One thousand and five hundred years, Twenty years and twelve beside, From the birth of Christ who saved us To the autumn when O'Carroll died. Mac Quillin (Walter, the son of Garrett) was killed in the church of Dunbo; and Conor, the son of O'Kane , a rich and affluent man, was burned in it, and Mac Con-Uladh (viz. James, the son of Art Mac Con-Uladh) was taken prisoner by the son of Donnell Cleireach O'Kane .

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1537. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred thirty-seven.

Depredations and burnings were committed by Calvagh O'Donnell in Clanawley; and another depredation was committed by him on O'Kane .

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1542. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred forty-two.

A hosting by O'Donnell and Calvagh in the summer of this year; and O'Rourke (Brian) and O'Kane (Manus, the son of Donough) joined their muster. After they had assembled together, they agreed to march against Mac Quillin (Rury, the son of Walter), and they did not halt until they arrived at the Bann. Here they divided the army into three portions, in order to cross the fords of the Bann, for they were prevented from using the boats of the river, because Mac Quillin, together with a strong body of English troops, was at the other side, to defend the river against them, and to prevent them from crossing it. The forces of O'Donnell, however, crossed the Bann in despite of them, though, in crossing it, they were in danger of being drowned, and encountered very great peril. Upon landing, they sent forth light scouring and terror-striking parties through the country, namely, one detachment eastwards to Cnoc-Lea, and another up along the Bann, and these seized upon heavy and substantial preys, and many great spoils, in every place through which they passed. But Calbhach O'Donnell, O'Rourke, and O'Kane , and their forces, obtained still greater and more numerous spoils than those seized upon by the other detachments. Each of these detachments encamped separately with their preys and spoils for that night. On the morrow O'Donnell ordered them to knock down, kill, hough, and break the bones of these immense spoils and preys, which they accordingly did; and it would be difficult to enumerate or reckon the number of cattle that were here struck down, besides more which the men of Breifny and the O'Kane s drove off to their own countries alive. After this Mac Quillin came to O'Donnell, and bestowed upon him great presents, consisting of horses, armour, and other beautiful articles of value, and made peace with him. O'Donnell, with his army, returned home safe and in triumph from that expedition. Mac Quillin, i.e. Rury, the son of Walter, and the son of Mac Donnell, went into Oireacht-Ui-Chathain, and committed great depredations. O'Kane , i.e. Manus, the son of Donough, with bonaghtmen of the Clann-Sweeny, whom he had then in his service, namely, the son of Mac Sweeny Fanad, and the descendants of Rory Mac Sweeny, went in pursuit ofthe preys; and, having overtaken Mac Quillin with his preys, a fierce engagement took place between them, in which Mac Quillin and the numerous Scots whom he had along with him were defeated, with a great slaughter of men, together with the son of Alexander, Carragh Mac Donnell, and the son of Mac Shane, with many others of Mac Quillin's forces. Mac Quillin himself and the son of Mac Donnell escaped with difficulty by flight; but great numbers of their people were drowned as they were crossing the Bann. Mac Quillin, having induced the English Treasurer and a great number of the English to assist him, made a second incursion against O'Kane . They took O'Kane 's castle, i.e. Leim-an-Mhadaidh, and slew and destroyed all the warders who were in the town; and Mac Quillin departed safe and victorious on that occasion. Some time afterwards Mac Quillin called into his service the descendants of Rory Mac Sweeny; the son of Donough, son of Mac Sweeny-na-dTuath; the son of Murrough Mac Sweeny; and the son of Mac Sweeny Banagh; and many others of the youths of the Clann-Sweeny along with them. These repaired to Mac Quillin, and were treated by him in an honourable and friendly manner, and entered into agreements and covenants with him. A treacherous and malicious plot was formed by the son of Mac Donnell, by the Scots, and also by Mac Quillin's people, namely, to come upon those noble and high-born youths of the Clann-Sweeny and attack them, after they had gone to them, and after every agreement they had made with Mac Quillin. They resolved upon this plot, and fell upon them as they were coming out of Mac Quillin's town, without warning, and unperceived by the Mac Sweenys, so that they slew the greater part of them. There were slain here the son of Mac Sweeny Banagh, and the son of Murrough Mac Sweeny; and the number that escaped was not great, in comparison with the number killed.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1544. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred forty-four.

An army was led by O'Donnell into the Route, and took Inis an-lochain, whereon Mac Quillin had a wooden castle and an impregnable fastness. O'Donnell took this castle, and gave it up to O'Kane . On this expedition O'Donnell also took the castle of Baile-an-lacha, and obtained many spoils, consisting of weapons, armour, copper, iron, butter, and provisions, in these towns. He afterwards took the island of Loch-Burrann, and the island of Loch-Leithinnsi, where he likewise obtained many spoils. He burned the whole country around, and then returned home safe after victory. The sons of Mac Donnell, James and Colla, came into the Route with a band of Scots, at the instance of Mac Quillin; and he and they proceeded to Inis-an-lochain, and took that town from O'Kane 's warders. Brian, the son of Donough O'Kane , and all that were with him on Inis-an-lochain, were burned, and also all the property, arms, and armour. Great depredations and injuries were committed by Mac Quillin upon O'Kane on

that occasion. O'Kane hired gallowglasses of the race of Rory Mac Sweeny; and one day as Mac Quillin crossed the Bann, and seized on a prey, O'Kane and his gallowglasses pursued and overtook him, stripped him of the prey, and slew and wounded a great number of his people.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1548. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred forty-eight.

A great defeat was given by O'Donnell (Manus) to his own son, Calvagh, and O'Kane (Manus, the son of Donough), at Srath-bo-Fiaich, where O'Kane himself and numbers of others were slain, on the 7th of the month of February.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1577. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred seventy-seven.

Con, the son of Brien, son of Owen O'Rourke, a man young in years, but perfect in hospitality and prowess, died. O'Kane (Aibhne, the son of Cumhaighe, son of Rory of the Route) was drowned in the Bann; and Rory, son of Manus, son of Donough, was inaugurated in his place.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1577. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred seventy-seven.

Con, the son of Brien, son of Owen O'Rourke, a man young in years, but perfect in hospitality and prowess, died. O'Kane (Aibhne, the son of Cumhaighe, son of Rory of the Route) was drowned in the Bann; and Rory, son of Manus, son of Donough, was inaugurated in his place. Meave, the daughter of Hugh Roe O'Donnell, a woman who was first married to Mac Gilla-Eoain of Scotland, and afterwards to Donnell Cleireach O'Kane ; a woman who had spent her life happily, prosperously, and affluently; who had obtained a great name, renown, and character, for her hospitality and demeanour; and who had passed a long time in piety at Donegal, died there in the eighty-seventh year of her age, after having performed many good actions.

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1585. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred eighty-five.

To this assembly also repaired Mac Mahon (Ross, the son of Art, son of Brian of the Early Rising, son of Redmond, son of Glasny); O'Kane (Rory, the son of Manus, son of Donough the Hospitable, son of John, son of Aibhne; Con, the son of Niall Oge, son of Niall, son of Con, son of Hugh Boy O'Neill, as representative of the O'Neills of Clannaboy; and Magennis (Hugh, the son of Donnell Oge, son of Donnell Duv).

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1592. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred ninety-two.

At this time the residence of O'Neill (Turlough Luineach) was at Strabane, where, before the time of this Turlough, the O'Neill had not usually held his residence. Great was his animosity to the Kinel-Connell, and to O'Donnell's brother-in-law, namely, the Earl O'Neill. O'Neill drew a party of the English of Dublin to strengthen him against the Kinel-Connell and the Earl O'Neill, namely, Captain Willis and Captain Fullart; and they had two hundred soldiers along with them. It was anguish of mind to the young O'Donnell that the English of Dublin should have come to the confines of his territory to spy his patrimony, and the province in general; wherefore, in a week's time he made a hosting into Tyrone. The people of the country fled on this second occasion before him, until they reached Cianachta-Glinne-Geimhin. He O'Donnell was informed that O'Neill and the English before mentioned were assembled with all their forces in the neighbourhood; and he ordered his troops to advance to the place where they were. This was accordingly done. He marched resolutely and fiercely against them in mid-day. When they perceived the Kinel-Connell approaching them, they did not wait for them, but fled, to avoid them, to a castle which was situated on the margin of a river called Roa. This was a strong, impregnable castle, and the mansion-seat of O'Kane . O'Donnell proceeded to lay siege to the castle. 0'Kane sent a messenger with a letter to him. What was stated in this letter was, that O'Donnell was his foster-son; that he O'Kane had ratified a friendship with him long since; that by reason of this friendship, it was now lawful for him O'Donnell to leave to him the property which had come under his asylum and protection; and that he would never again admit such, should he O'Donnell be in pursuit of it. O'Donnell granted him this request, but, returning back, remained three days and nights in the territory whence the spoils to which he had given protection had been removed, plundering and totally devastating it. He then went back to his own country, and never halted until he had reached Donegal, where he remained two months under cure. By this time he thought it too long that O'Neill and his English were left unattacked; wherefore, having assembled his forces, they proceeded through the gap of Barnesmore, and across the Rivers Finn and Mourne, on his way to Strabane, where O'Neill and his English were stationed; and they never halted until they came before them face to face. But O'Neill and his English did not come outside the donjon of the fortress to engage them; and when they were not responded to in battle, they set fires and flames to the four opposite quarters of the town, and did not depart until they had burned all the houses outside the walls; and when they could not excite the English to come forth to avenge the destruction, they returned home in triumph.

 

 

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